Choosing the Right Grocery Line and Other Important Decisions


In our society we have to wait in lines a lot. You just gotta to get used to it! Lines are plentiful, whether we are in traffic, store checkout lines and waiting to get into a special event.

I’m not very good at choosing the right lines.  The “right lines” of course, are the quickest and smoothest lines.

It does not matter if I’m at the grocery store, Target, the line to get hot dogs at The Dodger game, or the line to get in or out of a parking lot; I pick the wrong line.  

There is an art and a science to this. The science of ‘line-oligy” has, to this point in my life, eluded me.

If I pick the shortest line and get in it, then immediately something happens.  A guy wants to pay with a check but doesn’t have his ID. A woman wants to pay the entire $7.38 in coins, while talking on their cell phone and trying to find a coupon in her purse.

It’s a shift change and the employee has to change out the cash drawer with the new checker.

My line goes into ‘slo-mo’, as the longer line begins to zip along like they were on a moving sidewalk. Even if I use the reverse logic and get into one of the longer lines, then of course it remains the longest line. 

“Why would you choose this line??” I think to myself. “It’s the longest one.”

I begin to rub my temples like I’m trying to solve an algebra equation. 

“I think I’m gonna need to shave again soon.”

Some choices we make in life are trivial. Other choices are crucial to living the purpose for which we were created. There are monumental decisions like whom you will marry, where you will live and what you will pursue in life. But, I’ve noticed too, that it’s the little decisions in life that lead to a biggest impact.

This is our one and only life. This one is the only one we get. What we do with our life matters. It matters to you, to those closest to you, and it matters to God.

Five Decisions I Have to Make Everyday

1.  Find something to be grateful for and express it. 

I do this several times a day. Gratitude, when it’s genuine and expressed outwardly, changes my perspective on most situations. 

2.  Look for someone you can encourage.

There is no person who does not need encouragement. I need it often. Those who I think probably don’t need it, need it more than I realized. If the gift I leave with others is regular authentic encouragement, I suspect I’ll be leaving one of the most useful gifts I could.

3. Forgive someone.

Is there someone I need to forgive?  It’s amazing how my unspoken expectations can cause unrealistic disappointment.  We can often develop an attitude about someone because of something we have “expected” of him or her, whether they know about it or not.

Also, there are those “flagrant fouls” that people contribute to us in life. Even if I’m not over the hurt, I can still attempt to keep my heart focused in the right direction.  Sometimes when I think about a situation too intensely that occurred in the past, it feels like the violation has reoccurred.  The decision to forgive must reoccur also. 

4.  Remember to say, “I love you” as often you can.

My son and my daughter are in their twenties, and when we talk on the phone or in person they regularly end the conversation with, “Ok, I love you Dad.” I always notice. I don’t take it for granted. 

It reminds me to say, “I love you more often.” I don’t want people I care about to wonder if I love them. I don’t want people I love to have to try hard to remember the last time I told them.  

5.  What am I writing in today’s chapter of my story?

Our life is a story. Our history has written a part of our story. But our history does not determine the whole story. The decisions I make today both write my present and author my future.

So I ask myself, “What decision do I need to make, to write the next chapter in my story?

Is there a decision that will build my faith or my strength, and in doing so write a better life story?”

What daily decisions do you make that you have found to be powerful? Please let me know what decisions you value by writing in the comment section below. 

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